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Showing posts from March, 2015

Open World 2015 call for papers - my simple guidelines

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Most of you will already have received an email from the OpenWorld team announcing the call for papers for this year’s conference: https://www.oracle.com/openworld/call-for-proposals.html. Each year, a lot of people ask me how they can increase their chances of getting their paper accepted? Well, I am going to start by stating that product managers have absolutely no influence over which papers are accepted - even mentioning that a product manager will be co-presenting with you will not increase your chances! Yes, sad but true!
So how do you make sure that your presentation title and abstract catches the eye of the selection committee? Well, here is my list of top 10 guidelines for submitting a winning proposal:
1) Read the "call-for-papers" carefully and follow its instructions - even if you have submitted presentations for lots of Oracle conferences it is always a good idea to carefully read the call for papers and to make sure you follow the instructions. There is an exc…

Why SQL Part 3 - Simple optimization makes life simpler

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In the second part of this series of posts on (Why SQL Part 2 - It has a powerful frameworkof this series of blog posts I explained the underlying framework that SQL is based on. That framework is referred to as “relational algebra” and it was first described in 1970 by E.F. Codd while at IBM . It provides well-founded semantics for both modelling and querying a set of data. Codd's framework established a series of basic principles that govern the construction and execution of a query and these can be summarized as follows:ProjectionFilterJoinAggregateNow that we have examined the basics of the relational model let’s now move on to how the language actually determines the best way to answer a question based on its use of simplified and transparent optimizations. To understand why simplified and transparent optimization is so important it is useful to consider two of the most common programming paradigms and these are: procedural and declarative. Let’s explore these two approache…